Monday, April 18, 2016

How to Tell if Your Degree is Worthless

A quick little thing you can do, in under a minute, to convince your children or yourself that their/your degree is worthless:


4 comments:

grey enlightenment said...

a worthless degree = a degree that's only use is to teach it to someone else. like a pyramid scheme lol

The Question said...

I was chatting with a college girl the other day about which degree to get. Her sister who was with us asked about my journalism background. I told her if I could do it over again I'd get an electrical engineering degree or some sort of trade that the Baby Boomers looked down on.

A lot of pain and suffering could have been avoided if someone gone through all this with me instead of empty rhetoric like "get a job with benefits" or "a job that pays" which to a 19 year old has no meaning. Kids are not prepared to make decisions like that on their own, even though they should.

I've had a lot of incredible opportunities as part of my job but it will never bring home enough bacon to support a family. For young men that is the fundamental question if they still want that type of life.

JK Brown said...

I love how von Mises describes writing in this paragraph. "Writing was a liberal art, a hobby, but not a profession." Liberal art = hobby. Some people, who are real talented can make a living from their hobby.


"In the precapitalistic ages writing was an unremunerative art. Blacksmiths and shoemakers could make a living, but authors could not. Writing was a liberal art, a hobby, but not a profession. It was a noble pursuit of wealthy people, of kings, grandees and statesmen, of patricians and other gentlemen of independent means. It was practiced in spare time by bishops and monks, university teachers and soldiers. The penniless man whom an irresistible impulse prompted to write had first to secure some source of revenue other than authorship."

Mises, Ludwig von (2010-12-23). The Anti-Capitalistic Mentality (LvMI)

Burgess Shale said...

Worthless degrees are of great worth to colleges and universities. Education has become a perpetual motion machine.