Monday, April 24, 2017

Arbeit Macht Frei

The one thing missing from this, otherwise great, article is how debt ensures you guys all suffer HR ditzes, sadistic bosses, and with smiles on your faces.

Oh well, remember, Schmoopsie Muffins needs her Range Rover to impress the other soccer moms at the coffee store and your lil' Princess just "NEEDS" to go to that $250,000 a year liberal arts college.

It's all worth it.

6 comments:

Tucanae Services said...

Though the article has some points it totally misses the core problem -- government extended its power thru companies. Don't believe me? Remember the recent United Air incident? Have you wondered WHERE the airline thought it had the power to do what it did? Why it acquired that from the FAA, aka govt. Can't see your child's college transcripts? Where did the university think it could deny YOU the paying customer that right? Why thru FSFA, another government-business scheme.

See the trend? There will be more to come. Those work shackles you wear came from govt. The company is just the middleman.

Pat Haney said...

Oy vey...as Thomas Sowell once said, you have to be highly educated to come up with something that stupid. (or something along those lines)

We really have a huge "Ferdinand the Bull" generation. They'd rather sit in a field, sniffing flowers than deal with the Simon Legree bossman. In this world, you are free to pursue whatever you want to do with your life. Don't want to work? Don't. But don't expect those that do to pay for your life.

And therein lies the point. This article is a perspective of a millennial type with plenty of education but no discernible talent or skills. With both talent and skill, work is enjoyable. I've worked in trades and engineering all my career. I may not care for the some of the companies where I've worked, But I've always enjoyed my work. Contra to what this author says, I've worked for companies large and small and I've never seen the cigar chomping hard driving corner office boss. If I ended up not liking the company, I left. Usually to a competitor. Then again, I have STEM, and man skills.

I told my kids, find what you love to do, and find a way to make money with it. You may not get rich, but you'll be happy (BTW - Art, and Music are sale-able skills). This is where I part ways with the captain. STEM for one and all doesn't work. Some just don't have the ability to "get" STEM. For instance, programming. They can work with it, but they don't "Get" it, won't be very good at it, and will wind up slaving in one on those miserable hives in the article.

Jay M said...

On point Tucanae.

The article devolves into the typical Marxist indoctrinated socialist Utopia drivel and wanton attacks on "capitalism," but as often is the case blatantly ignores the very pointed fact: no one alive in the USA today has ever lived in a Free Market society.

Government, and more to the point, regulations are the cause of a majority of issues the author cites. Big corporations exist because regulations were penned which make competition difficult or outright impossible. The corps hold power over their workers because regulation makes it impossible for the workers to branch off and 'go their own way' to coin a phrase. Add in the triple-whammie of government debt, kicking the can, and infinite money (printing) and the resultant inflation helps to force the common folk to continue sweating day in and out just to make up the loss of value their savings suffer as their money reserves loses value and buying power.

We don't need a "post-capitalist" society. We need a post-communist one.

Anonymous said...

Debt equals slavery. Period. Full stop.

Moritz Krämer said...

As it should, because you took something from someone else and have yet to return it.

Bill Greenwood said...

The writer dances around the root of the problem without fully grasping it. The growth and power of large corporations has been mostly driven by an out of control regulatory environment. Gradually the regulatory regime reached a tipping point where some corp's had the kind of clout that allowed them to dictate which regulations could be repealed, and which ones could not. This has given deregulation a bad name, because the kinds of regulations which act as barriers to new competition remain in place, while those aimed at corporate governance are reduced.
The two most powerful drivers of prosperity for American workers have been the automobile, which granted mobility to everyone and gave life to the promise of income mobility by allowing workers to go where they could earn more without necessarily uprooting their families, and the growth of competition in manufactured goods. The need to compete on many levels drove employers to need to ensure their workforces were well motivated to make quality goods.
Unfortunately, unions have consistently pulled the tits off the cow and driven millions of good jobs off shore. Democrats in particular have waged decades of war against the private auto, burdening today's new car with thousands of dollars in regulatory costs, and then driving up fuel costs with taxes that don't go into roads but public transit that is often grossly inefficient and fails to attract enough patrons to even pay operating costs let alone the costs of construction. A car built today bears over $4000 in costs just to meet regulations imposed since 1995. It is invariably heavier, meaning more raw materials to build and more energy consumed to operate. At the same time it is only marginally cleaner or safer. The consumer is denied the full benefit of tremendous improvements in manufacturing technology or engineering prowess.
This process is repeated ad nauseum across multiple sectors of the economy. Over regulation makes it increasingly hard for individuals and groups of individuals to leave their secure employment and create enterprises which are direct competitors to their current employers. We require a wholesale revamping of regulations and a rethinking of the reasons for regulation.