Wednesday, March 06, 2013

I Ask for the Non-Western Civilization Equivalent



Good luck.

11 comments:

MR said...

Just awesome... it took me a while to learn that piece... I wonder if it's an original accompaniment...

Anonymous said...

Absolutely wonderful. Where has all the talent gone?

Anonymous said...

Chopin enjoying the ascent:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X1QM6YZC45g

Anonymous said...

The talent has gone to xbox...the hours of practice these men had to put in every day from childhood is mind-boggling..and it's hard...and it's expensive. The only way you get this type of virtuosity is with the diligence of those "tiger moms" Westerners tend to chastise for being too strict and demanding.

Bastiat Fan said...

That's not very multicultural of you, Captain.

Thank G-d.

Bastiat Fan said...

That's not very multicultural of you, Captain.

Thank G-d.

Anonymous said...

All of the talent has gone down the entitlement toilet.... That last flush was the last remnant of any critical thought possessed by the populace of the Western world.

The void left behind will be filled with tyranny and death.

Anonymous said...

Well, here's a non-western video that is somewhat similar to the one you show

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_WLwoQSIKv4

It shows a "jugalbandi" performance.

From Wikipedia: A jugalbandi or jugalbandhi (Devanagari: जुगलबंधी, Urdu: جگلندئ‍) is a performance in Indian classical music that features a duet of two solo musicians. The word jugalbandi means, literally, "entwined twins." The duet can be either vocal or instrumental.

Often, the musicians will play different instruments, as for example the famous duets between sitarist Ravi Shankar and sarod player Ali Akbar Khan, who played the format since the 1940s. More rarely, the musicians (either vocalists or instrumentalists) may be from different traditions (i.e. Carnatic and Hindustani). What defines jugalbandi is that the two soloists be on an equal footing. While any Indian music performance may feature two musicians, a performance can only be deemed a jugalbandi if it is neither clearly the soloist and nor clearly an accompanist. In jugalbandi, both musicians act as lead players, and a playful competition exists between the two performers.

---

the link shows a "sawal jawab" (question-answer) performance - where one musician plays a piece as a question, and the other responds with an answer.

NB: the "answer" is supposed to be harmonious to the question. The objective is not to "win", but to spontaneously create music

The quality of the recording is not great - and due to your individual (and western) tastes, the music may not sound as good to you.

But civilized forms of music exist beyond European traditions

Bob Wallace said...

"The only way you get this type of virtuosity is with the diligence of those "tiger moms" Westerners tend to chastise for being too strict and demanding."

You might want to look up the name "Asia Carrera" and see how she turned out and what she thinks of her Tiger Mom and Tiger Dad.

That stuff might work on Asians, who are herd ants anyway, but it doesn't work on whites. It's why we create nearly everything and they don't.

Anonymous said...

Hiromi Uehara

American Hindu Convert said...

Show me the non-South Asian equivalent of jugalbandi or any classical Indian music, dance or literature.

They have the most advanced aesthetic tradition on the planet, and it developed a long time before Europe. In fact, I think Europeans were still in caves at the time.

One of the reasons I converted and moved to India and Sri Lanka for years.